Top

Hog Hunting Music – No, Really!

June 17, 2015

If there’s one thing missing in the worlds of music and hog hunting, it’s music about hog hunting.  Sure, there’s been a tune or two out there about hunting, and even a few have mentioned wild boar, but overall, there’s a general dearth of songs specific to the thrill and madness that are hunting sus scrofa.

Or so I thought.

Anything can be found on the Interwebz.  It turns out, that not only are there a couple of great tunes out there… there’s even a Facebook page specifically dedicated to hog hunting songs!

Here’s a little something I just found today, featuring the music of Aussie, James McKay (it’s not his video, just his music).  Enjoy!

Use Enough Gun… Please

June 10, 2015

No irony intended, although what I’ve got to show you may seem that way.  So let’s just jump right to it, before I toss in my two cents.

Now it’s a pretty long clip, and it starts with some good information and ends with the hunter making good use of his kill.  The shot was good too, and the whole thing was well set up.  One thing stands out… .22 long-rifle.

According to our host, it’s “all you need if you know right where to put the bullet.”

Queue redundancy alert…

It is NOT all about shot placement.

Here is a list of the elements that went into that clean kill:

  • Shooting from an elevated blind
  • Shooting at close range (I don’t think he says, but it looks about 20 yards)
  • Shooting with a solid rest
  • Shooting a very accurate rifle
  • Shooting at a relaxed and (relatively) stationary animal
  • And, finally, perfect shot placement

The choice to use the .22lr is rationalized (by many people, including the host of this video) because the hogs are “just pests”.  It implies that it’s OK to eradicate them by any means.  It also implies that the risk of a poorly placed shot and crippled animal is perfectly acceptable, in the name of “pest control”.  In all honesty, I’ve come out with similar arguments in defense of eradication methods, such as shooting from helicopters.  If it’s really about killing as many as possible as efficiently as possible, you have to have the mindset of the exterminator.

But here’s the thing.  Take another look at that video.  How many hogs came to the bait?  Out of that sounder, how many did our host kill?

Is baiting and shooting one hog out of a small sounder really equivalent to control (never mind eradication)?  Or is it really just sport hunting?  And if it’s sport hunting, do the same ethics apply?

I’m going to stop short of outright, negative criticism, because it’s pretty clear that the fellow making this video knows what he’s doing, and he’s good at it.  It’s brutally obvious that the .22lr was sufficient to make the kill, albeit under ideal conditions (not just shot placement).  Similar videos demonstrate the capabilities of everything from .177 caliber air rifles to spears.

The problem is the consistently repeated claim that these marginal tools are “all you need” to kill hogs.   Unfortunately, the next thing you hear is the peanut gallery clamoring to get out there with their marginal weapons and wreak havoc of their own.  In a lot of ways, it’s like the long-range shooting craze that’s convinced scores of nimrods that 500 yards is supposed to be a “chip shot”, and the “right” gear will enable them to shoot deer-sized game at 1000 yards or more… or, in this case, they want to show up in the blind with grandpa’s old Hi-Standard, ready to pile up the pork.

I often feel a bit like Don Quixote when it comes to stuff like this, but I’d love to see a little less focus on “trick” hunting tactics and more on good, solid practices.  It shouldn’t be as much about what’s possible to do as it should be about what’s good to do.  (Of course, I also realize I’m treading awfully close on the hems of my favorite pet peeve… defining “right” and “wrong” based on arbitrary, emotion-based criteria.)

Maybe there’s nothing wrong with telling people that it’s good and fine to shoot hogs with a BB gun, if they want to try it.  Maybe there’s nothing wrong with promoting jumping out of the blind and biting their heads off either.  It’s a free country, right?

 

 

 

Type. Delete. Type. Delete. Type. Delete. But I Repeat Myself.

June 5, 2015

“It ain’t easy being me…”

Not to complain, but it certainly hasn’t been easy to be a blogger lately… particularly not a hunting blogger.  Because I haven’t been hunting.  Or shooting.  I’m not even sure which box my ammo is in right now.

It’s not that I haven’t been writing.  I have.  I’ve written thousands of words, at least, over the past several days.  I’ve addressed topics ranging from lead ammunition to Zambia’s recent decision to lift the ban on hunting lions.  I’ve written opinion laced with fact, and fact laced with opinion.  I even scratched out a touch of poetry.

And then I deleted it all.

I guess the redundancy of it is what gets me.  I need a new issue.  Or I need to go hunting.  Or maybe I need to hunt some new issues.   Whatever it is, stay tuned.  I’m still out here, and liable to start repeating myself again at any moment.

Unless something new comes along.  But then, as we know…

“The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.”

Food For Thought From Bill Heavey

May 26, 2015

I’m not doing much in the way of outdoors right now, but lots of other entertaining writers are picking up my slack.  Bill Heavey, writing the A Sportsman’s Life blog over at Field and Stream is often entertaining, and occasionally educational.  His latest post is a little bit of both, as he discusses how to take a child fishing.

He writes:

It’s about the child’s experience, not yours. You might get to fish and you might not. What matters is that the child enjoys it.

The instruction, of course, could easily carry over to taking a youngster hunting, or hiking, or… well, to any activity, really.   It’s not your trip anymore, it’s the child’s trip.  It isn’t about taking the lunker bass or trophy buck, it’s about showing the small human that this stuff is really a lot of fun.

Even then, though, Heavey offers another core nugget of wisdom.

None of this guarantees that the child will come to love fishing. It only guarantees that he won’t hate it because you forced him to do it your way or compelled him to do it for longer than he wanted.

Anyway, in lieu of coming up with something on my own today, this is what I have to offer.  Read it, and enjoy!

 

 

One More Memorial Day Post

May 25, 2015

This is making the rounds this morning on social media.  I don’t know much about it, and curse the cynicism that gives me pause, but it seems like a perfect thing to share this morning.


In memoriam, of the men and women who have given their lives in the service of our country.

A Little Reminder

May 22, 2015

I guess I do this almost every year, but I think it’s worthwhile to be a little redundant.  After all, that’s sort of what a holiday is, isn’t it?  So here it is…

It’s Memorial Day weekend.

It’s not cook-out weekend.  It’s not beginning-of-summer-tourist-season weekend. It sure as hell isn’t block-busting-sales-event weekend.  Sure, all of these things are going to happen, and much more as well.  But let’s not lose sight of what this is really all about.

Memorial Day is a celebration in memory of our troops who have died in battle, in the service of our country… the service of THEIR country.

Think on that for a minute.

Because that’s what Memorial Day is supposed to be about… thinking about it.

Remembering.

As you’re packing the cooler, firing up the grill, or popping the top on another beer, just slow down and give it a thought.  One way or another, every one of those who died did so to ensure the way of life that many of us take for granted.  That’s not a small thing.

Settling In – Part II

May 18, 2015

I guess I’ve been in the West too long.  I’d forgotten how green the air is here in North Carolina at this time of year.  Green and wet… not mossy and clammy like the Pacific Northwest, but verdant and dripping with warm water… like breathing through a blade of grass in a terrarium.

It’s not hot enough yet to be oppressive.  That comes in another month or so.  For now, it’s warm enough to break a sweat simply by walking out the door, but it still feels vital.  I may have grown a half-inch since I arrived… although, truthfully, any real growth has probably been more horizontal than vertical. Barbecue (real barbecue, made of pork and wood smoke and deliciousness) and Brunswick stew and lounging in the air-conditioning have a way of contesting the management of the middle-aged waistline.  Banana pudding is a bonus.

I suppose I’d also forgotten, a little bit, the comfortable pleasure of spending a warm afternoon with family.  We gathered at my brother’s place in Wilmington to celebrate a belated Mothers’ Day on Saturday.  There was great food, drinks, grandchildren (and great grandchildren), and it was really a pretty good day.  When I loaded Iggy the Party Dawg into the truck for the trip back to Durham, it was with the happy realization that these weekend events were no longer half a continent away.

I’m daydreaming about boats now.  It would probably be impractical and unwise at this particular moment to buy a boat, so I’m shopping for something in the 20 to 23 foot range.  I felt the salt in the air over the weekend, and it reminded me that the spanish and king mackerel will be coming into the near-shore water any time now.  In another month, the dolphin (dorado) and maybe even a sailfish or two will be inside of 20 miles, and I barely have to close my eyes to imagine the breeze in my face as I drag a couple of ballyhoo along a line of sargassum.  I shouldn’t, but I probably will.

Kat’s away in California right now with meetings, but when she comes back this weekend, the search for property begins in earnest.  I detoured off of the freeway on the way back from Wilmington yesterday, and had a chance to take in some of the countryside.  It’s certainly not Texas Hill Country, but it’s pretty… especially right now, in the full bloom of late spring.  There’s a lot of potential here, tangled in the cat claws, scrub oaks, and pine thickets.  I can work with this.

I felt something else in the air over the weekend.  It was wispy and passing, at first.  I didn’t recognize it because I think I’ve avoided it for so long.  It’s something I never felt in California.  I thought I had it in Texas, but it wasn’t this strong.  Once I let it in this weekend, though, blowing up the Cape Fear river on that wet, green breeze, there was no denying it.

I felt Home.

Settling In

May 13, 2015

Where’s the song of my canyon wren?

Where is that lilting call… those piercing, clear notes that build and climb and move something heavy in my chest?  Where is the tiny, grey body that perches on the porch rail, or sits in the gnarled, lightning-stricken oak tree outside of my bedroom?

It feels strange.

Absent as well are the other birdsongs, many of which have never been more than unidentified melodies… finches, sparrows, nuthatches, and so on, brightening the morning.  For that matter, the oak tree is also absent from my morning.  So is the view out my windows of the sun lighting the rocky western ridge of the canyon, and the seasonally changing scents… agarita blooms, dried grasses, caliche dust…

I guess, if I were to put it in perspective, it’s not those things that are absent.  They’re right there, where they belong.  I am the one who is gone away.  I’m not there anymore.

As I type this, I look out the window to see a privacy fence.  Over the top of the fenceline, forming what there is of a skyline, are a few oaks and maples, and the empty space where the pine forest is slowly being supplanted by multi-family homes (or whatever they’re building today).  If you’ve ever seen a forest after a fire or a hurricane has ripped through it, that’s what the woods across the street look like now… or at least what I can see, that isn’t blocked by this fence…  a lot of empty space where treetops should be.

In place of birdsong, I hear traffic when I awaken  Private vehicles buzz back and forth, yards from the bedroom window, interspersed with the roar of construction trucks hauling concrete, lumber, sheetrock, and brick.  The sharp beep of backup signals, and the belch of air brakes let me know the crews are arriving to begin work on the nearby units.  Soon, instead of woodpeckers tapping a tattoo on the tree trunks, I’ll hear the rap of hammers and nail guns, whining saws and drills, and the multi-lingual shouts and chatter of the carpenters, electricians, painters, and bricklayers.  And sure, there is birdsong, but it’s difficult to hear it over the cacophony.

I take small comfort… minuscule solace… in the deer tracks I saw when I took Iggy for his morning walk.

And there’s another alien thought… the whole concept of having to take the dog for a “walk”.   It’s one thing to let him run around when I go out to feed horses, check the fences, or any of the myriad ranch tasks with which I busied myself in the past.  It’s one thing to let him come indoors for a treat, and then turn him back out for bed.

But now it’s another thing altogether.  Now I have to make the conscious effort to remember he’s here, in the house instead of outside (where a dog should be).  I have to accompany him to go out in the yard for water or to hike his leg on the little, non-native ornamental bushes.  I have to walk him, sometimes quickly, out of the complex and across to the open area where he can take a crap in a place that I’m not required (by strange, social convention if not by law) to pick it up for disposal in a little, plastic bag.  What does it say about a place when dog shit needs to be collected in plastic and trucked to a landfill?

This, too, shall pass.

I suppose.

Ha! I Lied! One More Last Blast… Axis Hunting When I Should Be Packing

May 7, 2015

It was a dark and stormy morning.

No, really, it was.

But that didn’t stop us as I drove on back into the heart of the southern Hill Country.  My brother was here to help me pack, and I’d arranged a “quick” axis, meat hunt for us.  We’d be meeting up with my friend, Blaise, up at Boiling Springs Ranch (you may remember from last spring’s hunt).

The plan was simple.  We’d do a Texas-style safari across the 10,000 acre ranch, spot our deer, and make it done.

For a change, that’s pretty much exactly what happened.  I had my doe within 15 minutes.  It took a little longer to find one for Scott (we saw some nice bucks, though), but by 10:00 we had two animals with two shots and it was time to go skin, butcher, and pack the meat for the long haul to North Carolina.

But now that’s done, and while we’ve been seeing some axis here at the Hillside Manor; I’ve threatened my brother with grave, physical harm if he shoots another one today.

Too much to do!  The plan is to roll out of here tomorrow, and we’ll be in NC by Saturday night (or Sunday, depending on travel conditions).

So good-bye, Texas.

At least for now.  I’m pretty sure we’ll be back for an occasional hunt.

I’d add some poignant final note here, but I guess I’ve really said it all already.  Sure do hate to go, though.

Bringing It To A Close – One More Hunt

May 4, 2015

It’s hard to believe how much crap you can accumulate in a few years.  When you add it to all the crap I’ve accumulated over my lifetime, even after the minor purge when I left California, it’s still a lot of crap.  And packing all of this crap… well, it’s a crappy job.  (Apologies and all due reverence to George Carlin.)

It’s even crappier when you put it off, procrastinate, get depressed and demotivated, and then, the weekend before you’re supposed to move, you say, “the hell with it,” and go hunting instead of packing and organizing.  That just sounds like such a bad idea that it doesn’t surprise me at all that I did it.

Yeah, I know better.

I’ve got boxes stacked all over the house, and only about half of them are loaded.  I’ve got logistics to figure out, a barn full of horse tack, hunting and fishing gear, tools, and miscellaneous odds and ends.  I’m not even sure how it’s going to fit in the 26′ truck (plus the Dodge).  I should have it all lined up in the barn, packed in labeled boxes and organized for storage.

But instead, I pulled together a hunt with my friend, John, and pretty much blew off any pretense of a productive weekend… although one might argue that adding a hog to the freezer is productive.  Unless, of course, one is supposed to be in the process of clearing that freezer for travel.

So John rolled in Friday night and after an evening of catching up (or falling behind, thanks to Glenmorangie), the pre-dawn silence was shattered by cries of, “reveille, reveille!”  We got a slow start, so I drove fast, powering over the caliche to meet our host/guide, Kirby Cooper, who would be taking us to a little piece of Hill Country paradise in the Edwards County canyons.

The moon was waxing, and game was feeding all night, and despite our highest hopes, the morning hunt did not pan out.  We cruised back to town for lunch, and to tend to some business (a back-up contract for the sale of Hillside Manor, in case the initial buyers fail to meet the contingency), and then rolled back up to the top of the plateau at around 18:00.  Kirby told us he’d been seeing a lot of hogs in the evening, and the sign I saw earlier suggested that he wasn’t exaggerating.  There was a lot of sign.  And that’s a good sign.

Usually.

For my part, the evening started with a hike.  The wind was wrong for hunting the blind and feeder, so I climbed the rocky hillside to a point about 150 yards from the feeder.  In the elevated position, I could see a lot of country, but I was focused on the dry creek bed below the feeder.  In this country, it’s been my experience that these dry creeks often become hog highways.  Sure enough, about an hour later, a boar showed up and meandered around in the rocky opening.  Unfortunately, from my position the only shot would be offhand and standing, and that’s not a shot I’m comfortable with at that range… particularly when I’m pretty sure that this is not going to be my only chance.  Fortunately, hogs don’t pay much attention to the sound of a clumsy hunter tripping over rocks and stabbing limbs in his eyes as he scrambles for a better position.

Unfortunately, boar hogs do pay attention to threats from angry sows.

As I found a new position where I could sit down and use a stump for a rest, the boar stepped up out of the creek.  I heard an authoritative grunt from the brush on the other side of the clearing, and the boar spun and trotted off down the creek bed.  Kirby had told me that there is a big, spotted sow with some small babies in the area, and I figured she must have threatened ol’ Wilbur with something more severe than a spider bite if he came near her little ones.  I couldn’t see her, but I could hear the familiar sounds of clacking jaws as something was cleaning up the corn from the ground.  A moment later, I saw a little red piglet hop-running across the clearing, and then back into the brush.  Soon, all was quiet except for the roar of the wind and the songs of birds.

There’s a good reason this part of Texas is a world-renowned birding destination.  Excuse the aside, particularly since I’m not a birder, but it’s worth pointing out that from late February until June or July, the brush and trees are alive with a staggering variety of songbirds (and other birds too).  A morning or evening in the blind at this time of year provides the most amazing concert you could ever want to hear.  A little birdwatching becomes obligatory, and you spot any number of finches, flycatchers, warblers, orioles, and my very favorite, the painted bunting.  It’s almost enough to distract you.

But I wasn’t too distracted to notice the big, red sow moving slowly along the tree line on the far side of the creek.  At well over 300 yards, I wasn’t about to try a shot, and she was moving constantly away (once again, a feeder and bait are not a guarantee).  I considered hopping up and going after her, and I’m fairly certain I would have been able to catch up and kill her, but it was still early.  Instead of going after her, I decided to wait and see what might come to me.

On the far canyon wall, I spotted a dark creature moving along.  I’d left my binoculars at the house, so I strained my eyes to figure it out.  At first I thought it was a hog, but after a few moments, I could see that it was a sika deer.  I knew there were some around, so I enjoyed the good fortune of seeing one.  Then I saw another dark spot, this one much closer, moving through the brush along the edge of the creek bed.  In a moment, I could see that it was the boar.  I guess he figured the woman and children were gone now, and he could come up and have dinner in peace.

Last Texas boar He didn’t count on me.

I waited until he was well out into the middle of the rocky creek, and then leveled the crosshairs on his neck.  The stump was as good as a shooting bench, and I felt pretty good when I pulled the trigger.  When the muzzle blast cleared, I saw the pig on his back with all four feet in the air.  I sat tight for another half hour or so, waiting to see what else came in.  The boar had rolled onto his side, and then his feet started scrabbling.  I was fairly certain it was just reflex. He’d died so quickly, his body wasn’t aware of his demise.  But after a moment I decided to go down and make sure he didn’t get back up.  Just in case.

I was delighted, on arrival, to see a serious case of reverse ground-shrinkage.  When I first spotted this guy, I’d guessed him at about 70-80 pounds.  By the time I reached the bottom of the canyon and walked up to him in the rocks, he’d grown to a respectable boar and probably in the neighborhood of 150 or 160 pounds, with decent little teeth sticking out of his face.

Sadly, John’s evening did not pan out as well.

Nor did the next morning.

John mentioned, as he drove off to the airport Sunday afternoon, that he always finds a way to be the butt of the joke when I write up one of our hunts.  That made me reflective, and gives me pause now as I reach the end of this little screed.  I hate to make him feel bad, again.  I mean, the poor guy spent two days in the blind out here back in November, without even seeing a whitetail deer (the Hill Country has the highest deer population in the United States).  Then, this weekend he came back, gamely, to hunt Texas hogs and get skunked again. I’m sure he feels bad enough without me rubbing it in.

That would just be mean.

 

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bottom