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Is This Where Social Media Is Bound?

July 23, 2014

I guess I first logged onto the Internet around 1988 or ’89.  If I remember correctly, my first foray was setting up a CompuServe account.  I had the World Wide Web at my fingertips.  I didn’t really know what to do with it at the time, until AOL came along with a user interface and my first taste of social networking (and yeah, I know about The WELL, but I wasn’t part of that).

It was pretty cool then, and it’s pretty cool now.  Social networks provide us with an opportunity to share opinions and information… to debate… to vent… to commiserate… and so much more.  I’ve met a lot of good people.  I’ve discussed topics that I cared about, from hunting and the outdoors to literature and music.  And, of course, I’ve written this blog.

But of course there’s the darker side.  The Internet provides anonymity.  Anonymity leads to abuse.  People say words they would never voice in the presence of other people.  Pretend to be someone they’re not.  With anonymity there is no accountability.  Lie, and call it “truth”.  Make threats without fear of retaliation.

Sometimes, it gets a little overwhelming… as if people have agreed to set aside common sense, decency, and respectful discourse.  Politics has become a game of name-calling and the propagation of memes that rivals anything the 18th and 19th centuries could have thrown at us (unlike our ancestors though, we have no excuse in the 21st century, since we have access to the facts and research from the best minds in the world).  Considered, logical, fact-based debate has devolved into ideologically polarized dogma.

Apparently, when some of us can’t win the battle with wits and words, we turn to technological sabotage… hacking.  Disagree with a site?  Shut it down with a denial of service attack, or hack the site and add bogus content.  Plant virus-laden links.  Or just bombard it with hate-filled vitriol.  Silence those with whom you disagree by any means necessary.

These attacks, lately, have been turned more and more to pro-hunting websites and social media pages.  It’s become so bad, in fact, that hunting advocacy organizations are forming defensive ranks in an effort to fight back.  Here’s the most recent release from the US Sportsmen’s Alliance (USSA).

Task Force Formed to Counter Cyber Threats to Hunters

(Columbus, Ohio) – Sportsmen, conservation organizations and outdoor personalities met at the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance (USSA) headquarters yesterday to develop strategies to counter the recent increase in cyber-attacks on hunters.

The group makes up the Hunter Advancement Task Force with most members sharing a common theme of having been targeted by animal rights activists through social media.

“This is a great opportunity to start developing ways to hold those responsible for the recent wave of cyber-attacks against sportsmen accountable,” said Nick Pinizzotto, USSA president and CEO. “The task force is not only working to stop direct attacks on hunters but also discussing how best to educate the public on the vital role sportsmen play in the conservation of all wildlife.”

Attendees included outdoor television personalities Melissa Bachman and Jana Waller, Colorado hunter Charisa Argys along with her father Mark Jimerson,  Doug Saunders of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Bill Dunn of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, John Jackson of Conservation Force, Dennis Foster of the Masters of Foxhounds Association, Tony Schoonan of the Boone and Crockett Club and Mark Holyoak of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Other attendees included USSA President and CEO, Nick Pinizzotto, Evan Heusinkveld, USSA vice president of government affairs, Bill Horn, USSA director of federal affairs, Michelle Scheuermann of Bullet Proof Communications and author Michael Sabbeth.

Bachman, a television producer and host, found her life and career threatened after posting a photo of an African lion she harvested to her Facebook page last year. Almost immediately, Bachman came under attack from anti-hunters around the world. Bachman also found herself the target of death threats that “hit way too close for comfort” when anti-hunters showed up at her office.

“Regardless of your beliefs about hunting, Americans can all agree that threatening someone’s life is simply unacceptable.” said Bachman.

Other members of the task force have also had personal experiences with cyber-bullying including Waller who has had not only threats to her life, but also to her career. Waller, the star of Skull Bound TV, found herself having to defend her livelihood after an anti-hunter called her show sponsors to accuse her of poaching.

“The whole issue of harassment is so important,” said Waller. “I am scared it is going to deter people from standing tall and proud as hunters.”

While attacks on outdoor-celebrity hunters have been going on for years, average hunters have largely avoided the wrath of the anti-hunting community.  Earlier this year, however, Charisa Argys was thrown into the spotlight when a picture of her legally harvested mountain lion appeared online. The image brought a flood of criticism and threats not only to her, but to family members as well.

“Just because some anti-hunters in Europe went ballistic over a legal hunt, this issue is going to be associated with me for the rest of my life,” said Argys. “It is never going to go away. It’s going to be there forever. It could affect my job prospects and my life.”

This initial task force meeting was just the first of many to develop short and long-range strategies to protect hunters from cyber harassment.

“In the short term we are developing aggressive legal approaches to pursue both civil and criminal legal actions to prosecute anti-hunting harassers.” said Bill Horn, USSA director of federal affairs. “In the long term, we would like to cultivate strategies to provide additional legal protections for hunters who are finding themselves the target of cyber bullying.”

Pinizzotto added, “What this group discussed today and the ideas generated are a terrific first step in protecting hunters now and in the future. We have some of the brightest minds in our industry working on this critical issue. I look forward to continuing this discussion and adding additional key groups and individuals to the team in the coming weeks.”

 

Comments

3 Responses to “Is This Where Social Media Is Bound?”

  1. Is There Where Social Media Is Bound? | AllHunt.com on July 24th, 2014 01:29

    […] Is There Where Social Media Is Bound? […]

  2. Mike Munoz on July 28th, 2014 10:02

    When this sort of situation happens it highlights who is really the level-headed, well-informed party in the matter. Stoop to immature grade school tactics, shameful really, and hurtful to respectful and mindful hunters everywhere. Now if we hunter can refrain from the same kind of behavior that would really spotlight the severity and number of these kinds of attacks. As well as providing some ammo against those who would bash and vilify hunting. Ignorance and hate typically doesn’t get you anywhere.
    Being a hunter in CA I have learned how and when to discuss/debate/or argue with those types and their groups. Typically if you remain calm and informative they get wild-eyed and anxious, most people don’t like being told almost everything they here from some anti-hunting groups is a bunch of bull or outright lies. Everyone in CA seems to think all hunters just want to kill animals for fun, nothing else. Idiots.

  3. Phillip on July 28th, 2014 13:16

    Thanks, Mike.

    I agree. Keeping a cool head, and sticking to verifiable facts is generally the best approach. And sometimes, that’s not enough. As an intelligent individual, sometimes it’s as important to know when to walk away as it is to know everything in the world about conservation and ethics.

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