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Hog Blog Gear Review – Thermacell Camp Lantern

September 14, 2015

August, in the South Carolina low country.

At a time of year when most folks are loath to step outside of the air conditioning, my brother, Scott, and I are here to hunt early season whitetails and hogs.  The air is wet and heavy, to the point where it feels like I need gills just to walk to the stand.  Temps start in the mid-80s at pre-dawn, and it only goes up from there.  Even sitting still in my perch, 12 feet off the ground, rivulets of sweat run down my chest and back and soak through my thin, camo shirt.  Soon the cloth is sticky, my skin is sticky, and every movement is uncomfortable.

Aedes_aegypti

“Aedes aegypti” by Muhammad Mahdi Karim (www.micro2macro.net) Facebook Youtube – Own work. Licensed under GFDL 1.2 via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aedes_aegypti.jpg#/media/File:Aedes_aegypti.jpg

My stand overlooks a pond at the edge of a swamp.  In the early darkness, the croaking of alligators echoes through the steamy air.  Tree frogs “gronk” and creak to the steady background buzz of cicadas.  An owl hoots somewhere from the blackness, and is answered from somewhere else.  After a few moments, I recognize another sound… constant and everywhere… the droning whine of mosquitoes.

Of course, the skeeters aren’t a surprise, and I’ve prepared with a generous dousing of DEET-based spray.  I can only hope that any deer or hogs in the vicinity are crippled by hay fever or head colds this morning, because I smell like a chemical factory.  But it’s the only way I know to minimize the blood loss to the voracious swarms of these insect-spawn of Satan.

And it barely works.

As the sun rises, not only do I stink of chemicals, but I’m swatting and waving off the dogged and ongoing aerial assault.  By the time I get back to camp at mid-morning, I’m covered in itchy little welts.  The damned things have bitten me in any spot not covered in toxic sludge.  They’ve even bitten my kneecaps through my pants!

Sharing camp with Scott and me was a group of hunters from New Jersey.  Most were newcomers to southern hunting, and the conditions that go with it.  But they’d been warned, and a couple of the guys had come prepared with a gizmo called a “Thermacell.”  They’d never used these devices before, but based on recommendations they picked a couple up and brought them along on this trip.  After the first night, these guys were raving about the effectiveness of the little, green unit.

I investigated a little more, and learned that this Thermacell employed a butane gas burner to heat a wick and release some sort of bug repellent “incense” (the active ingredient is allethrin).  I was skeptical about the whole thing (I’d seen a lot of bug repellent gadgets, sprays, and salves in my lifetime).  First, I was doubtful that it would actually work on the mosquitoes in this swamp, and second, I figured anything that burned a wick would probably repel hogs and deer better than it repelled bugs.

Over the weekend, though, as I swatted bugs and watched at least one hog run off at the stench of my DEET bathed carcass, these hunters came into camp with a nice, eight-point buck and a couple of hogs… and singing the praises of Thermacell the whole time.  My curiosity was piqued.

This all took place several years ago, and since that time I’ve become an ardent fan of Thermacell.  The damned things just work.  I’ve used them from the NC swamps to the CA salt marshes, and once the wick heats up, skeeters and biting bugs don’t come around (it doesn’t work so well on some other bugs, like the annoying “candle moths” we had in Texas, but those bugs don’t bite).

I’ve written a couple of reviews about the Thermacell since then, and I’m in fairly regular contact with the PR folks who represent the company.  A year or two back, they sent me one of their new Thermacell Patio Lanterns, which is basically a battery-powered lantern that incorporates the Thermacell repellent system.  I really liked the lantern, and it was great for setting out on the porch for sunset drinks, or to bring out to the grill on a summer evening.  If I had to call out any sort of drawback to this lantern, it’s that it isn’t particularly robust.  I wouldn’t toss one in a backpack or the saddlebags, because there’s a good chance it would be in pieces by the time you were ready to use it.

The good folks at Thermacell saw this too, and in 2015, they came out with the new Thermacell Camp Lantern.  I received a review sample this past spring, and I’m ashamed to say that with the move from Texas and everything else, I’m only now getting a chance to put it through some paces.

First of all, there’s not much need to talk about the bug repellent qualities.  It works just as well as the original, although I think it’s interesting that even as the lantern light attracts bugs, the repellent keeps the vicious little bastards at bay.  Unfortunately, moths and beetles aren’t affected by the repellent, so you probably don’t want to hang this light right over your camp stove.

The difference in construction is significant, though.  The Camp Lantern is still pretty lightweight, but it feels much more solid than the Patio Lantern.  The base is rubberized, which gives the unit a little more heft, but more importantly; it makes it feel like it can take a little more of the kind of abuse you’d expect from something designed for outdoors use.  You’d probably still need to be a little careful with it, but I think you could drop this in the saddlebags for a long ride in to camp without too much worry.

The lantern uses D batteries, and is advertised to last 50 hours at the highest setting (the lantern has three light settings).  I haven’t had the chance to test this, and probably won’t.  There’s a cool little indicator light that lets you know when your batteries are running down, so you won’t be left in the dark by surprise.

If there’s a drawback, it could be the price point.  One of the reasons I think Thermacell units have become so popular is that they’re really affordable.  I think a new unit retails in the neighborhood of $25.00.  The Camp Lantern, on the other hand, is listed for $59.99 (on the Thermacell web site).  That’s not “expensive” as outdoor gear goes, but I can see where the hard-working, budget-conscious individual might think twice about the value there.  Back in the day when my dollars came a lot more dear, I’d probably think about just buying the standard Thermacell unit and stick with my old gas lantern.

Overall, though, I really like this unit.  I haven’t done much rough camping lately, but you can bet that if I join Scott next month on his hunt on the Roanoke River, I’ll be tossing this lantern in the boat.

 

Comments

3 Responses to “Hog Blog Gear Review – Thermacell Camp Lantern”

  1. Hog Blog Gear Review – Thermacell Camp Lantern | AllHunt.com on September 14th, 2015 10:04

    […] Hog Blog Gear Review – Thermacell Camp Lantern […]

  2. David on September 14th, 2015 16:57

    I have used Thermacells before but until recently hadn’t purchased any. This year I finally bought two of the units and wonder how I ever hunted or fished the Suisun Marsh or the California Delta without them. I keep one in my rig and one in my pack at all times now.

    I will definitely pick up one of the lanterns based on your recommendation.

  3. Phillip on September 15th, 2015 19:40

    David, I don’t think you’ll be sorry. But if you are, make sure and post up here. Let us know what worked and what didn’t.

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