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Hog Blog Gear Review – Rudy Project Hypermask Performance Glasses

February 26, 2015

I have a confession to make.

It’s not earthshattering, nor is it necessarily incriminating, but here it is…  I almost never wear protective eyewear when I’m shooting.

I know.  Shudders, right?  Oh, wait, what’s that?  Neither do you?

In my experience (which is certainly not global, but it isn’t exactly “limited”), most folks don’t bother with eye protection when they’re shooting, or hunting.  I don’t believe most of us consider that, when we’re sighting down the barrel of a gun, we’re actually holding a potential fragmentation grenade.  I just don’t think any of us see things that way, especially if we’ve never actually witnessed a catastrophic firearm failure.  We all trust in the reliability and design of our guns, and we know that it’s extremely rare for a firearm to blow up… or most of us probably wouldn’t be out there shooting in the first place.

Of course, the more realistic risks are much smaller.  It’s easy to take for granted the powerful process required to drive a projectile downrange, but if you stop for a second and consider all the things that are happening in and around that reaction, eye protection begins to make more sense.  Besides the bullet or shot that go downrange, there are any number of small particles flying off in different directions… including everything from brass and copper shavings, to particles of dirt and dust.  Sometimes, those particles are moving pretty fast.  While I’ve been fortunate enough not to sustain any real injury, I’ve certainly had this stuff come back and hit my eyes.  But, hey, no harm, no foul, right?  So I stubbornly continue to shoot without eye protection.

The exception, of course, is at monitored shooting ranges where protective equipment isn’t just good safety practice… it’s a liability issue.  Thus, it’s a rule.

When I shot at the range back in CA, this was the case.  But, as strictly enforced as most of the rules were at that range, no one ever really bothered to check your eyewear for quality or suitability.  I usually showed up with my old Ray Ban Aviators, glass lenses and all.  These were definitely not safety glasses, and while they probably stopped any blown debris that came directly at me, they offered no protection from the sides.    But I liked them because, unlike a lot of other tinted glasses, they did not distort my vision.

Have you ever tried to play baseball with inexpensive, polarized sunglasses (for that matter, even some expensive glasses)?  Sure, if someone throws the ball to you, you can reach out and catch it.  But try fielding a high, fly ball.  How’s that depth perception work out for you?  I still remember the day I sort of had this epiphany… and shortly afterward realized that my skeet shooting also seemed to suffer whenever I wore these glasses.  With a little practice, you will usually adapt to the distortion, but I never liked the idea that I had to change my habits… especially when I could just take the glasses off and everything is normal.

I also hate having the glasses between my eye and the scope when I’m shooting the rifle.  It feels awkward, and it throws off my eye relief.  Even at that range in CA, when I got ready to sight through the scope, I’d surreptitiously slip my glasses off.  If the Range Master or the safety monitors ever saw me, they never said anything.

And then there are those cheap safety glasses you can pick up for eight or nine bucks at the range, or for $2.98 (or something like that) at WalMart.  Yeah, you’ve seen them.  You’ve probably used them.  And they’re great for a little while, until the first time you go to wipe the sweat or dust off of them and score the plastic lenses.  By the end of an extended shooting session, you’ve got a raging headache and your vision is so occluded that you’re really starting to guess at shot placement.  After one use, they end up in the trash with the empty ammo boxes and used cleaning rags.

Excuses.

The fact is, I’m not going to sit here and become an evangelist for wearing eye protection when you shoot.  I just feel like that would be a little hypocritical.  While I’ve personally become slightly more conscientious about it, I seldom think twice if I happen to be out in the barn and decide to grab something out of the safe and fire a few shots.  On the other hand, I’m sure as hell not going to tell anyone they shouldn’t protect their eyes.  Just like seatbelts and motorcycle helmets, the science is there… you’re going to be safer if you take protective measures.  I say this with full self-awareness, you’re smarter to use protection than not.

So I guess that’s a long way around to get to a gear review.  That’s just how I do things around here.  It’s my blog.

Rudy Project Hypermask I don’t always wear eye protection when I shoot, but when I do, I wear the Hypermask Performance, from Rudy Project.

Was that too cornball?  Who cares?

Even though I don’t habitually use them, I’ve gone through a fair number of various shooting glasses over time.  Many of them are pretty much purpose-built, with the features required for safety, but not a heck of a lot of fashion sense.  You wouldn’t want to wear them on your next drive to town.  Those are the glasses I keep in the safe for guests.

But every once in a while, I get a pair that I actually like so much I use them for other purposes.  The Hypermask Performance glasses fall into that category.  Sure, they’re a little nuvo-tech for my normal sense of fashion (give me jeans, t-shirts,  boots, and aviator glasses), but I think they still look pretty cool.  They also feel good on my face.  They’re not too heavy, pushing down on my nose, and they sit at a comfortable distance from my eyes.  It did take me a minute to get used to the straight temples, as I sort of like my glasses to hook behind my ear, but I found them really secure, even when I was bouncing around on the tractor.

It’s not just the looks that I liked, though.  The lenses are photochromic, and I found that they reacted pretty quickly between indoors and out.  The particular pair they sent me for review has their “Racing Red” lenses.  According to the website, these lenses adjust to filter between 15% and 50%.  In my testing so far, they’re really great when it’s overcast, or for wearing inside, but they don’t get dark enough (in my opinion) in direct sunlight.  But I have always been a little sensitive to bright light.

Where I really got a kick out of these glasses was during a recent drive on a rainy, foggy trip into San Antonio.  It was too dark for my Ray Bans, so I tossed these in the truck when I left the house.  I was really digging the contrast and sharpness as I drove.  The glare that usually makes driving in these conditions so dangerous was cut to almost nothing, allowing me to see traffic clearly, well down the road.  Later, as I drove out of the storm, the lenses adjusted with the light so I never felt the need to switch back to my other sunglasses.  That was cool.

Now, I know that none of that is “new”.  Photochromic lenses have been around a long time, as have driving glasses that cut glare and enhance vision in foul weather.  But I don’t think anyone is throwing around words like, “revolutionary,” or “ground-breaking.”

Impact-proof lenses aren’t new either.  I’ve got a couple of pair of “tactical” glasses laying around, and all of them advertise indestructible lenses.  Some of this stuff is designed for use in combat, so I know they’re not messing around.  So while I’m not really worried about blowback from breaching doors,  or flying rock and shrapnel during a firefight, I do like knowing that these glasses are designed with that kind of thing in mind.  If I blow up a primer, or if a clump of dirt blows out of the cylinder of my .44, these glasses will stop it before it blinds me.  And, even better, not only will my eyes be left intact, the glasses will be too!

How much did I test this?  Honestly, I didn’t.  I really, really wanted to set these things up on a post at about 30 or 40 yards, and have a go at them with the shotgun, but they’re just too damned nice. For the same reason, I didn’t take them out on the porch and whack them with the hammer either (I once tested a pair of Vuarnets that way, when they first came on the market.  But that’s another tale for another time.).  I did wear them while I was shooting the shotgun a little bit, and I still have both eyes, undamaged, so I guess they worked… right?

As with any product, testing while it’s brand new is one thing, but time will tell.  I can’t speak for the durability of the Hypermask Performance glasses, because I’ve only had them for a couple of months, and they really haven’t been subjected to a lot of use.  These things aren’t cheap (well, mine were because they were review samples), so I would expect them to hold up well to their intended use.  In addition to shooting, these glasses are marketed to road racers (bicycle, triathlon, etc.) and that’s generally not a posh life for equipment.

Oh, and what is “not cheap”?  On the Rudy Project website, the listed regular price for the Hypermask Performance is $249.99, but it’s currently (as of this writing) marked down to $162.49.  I have no idea how long that price will be good.  If you’re just looking for something to wear while you shoot, this may be a little pricey.  But as I learned, you can wear these glasses a lot of places besides the shooting bench.

To summarize… they’re pretty nice glasses, they fit comfortably, and I think they work well.

Would I buy them for myself?

Honestly, I probably would not, but that’s just because I have a pretty stable preference in my daily-wear sunglasses, and I don’t really use shooting glasses as much as I probably should.  That said, if I were involved in competitive shooting, or if I spent a lot of time at the range, I could see kicking out the money for a pair of these.  Not only do they serve their purpose for safety, I think they would look pretty danged cool on the firing line.  And, of course, you can wear them on the drive home.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

2 Responses to “Hog Blog Gear Review – Rudy Project Hypermask Performance Glasses”

  1. JAC on February 27th, 2015 21:54

    When I was in school, the cycling team I was on was sponsored by Spy. I have a bunch of cycling glasses in all kinds of shades, clear, blue, yellow, grey. The rub on sports glasses is that they pair best with acidwash jeans. It’s true, of course, but as far as it goes, those Rudy’s are pretty acceptable.

    I already bought an Olympia flashlight because you told me to, so why not some glasses.

    See you soon.

  2. Phillip on March 2nd, 2015 17:20

    John, I need to start making sure the folks who send me this stuff read these replies!

    Sports glasses and tactical eyewear are getting it on and making love children when it comes to the current trend in shooting glasses. You’ve got ballistic material in a stylish (but bulletproof) frame. But if you watch any of those shooting competitions, these new glasses sure look cool on the competitors.

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