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News And Reviews – CA Lead Law, MO Hog Regs, Rapala Skinning Knives, Browning Headlamps

June 29, 2016

I suppose a lot of folks think it’s a little early for hunting news and gear reviews, but the truth is that we’re just a couple of days out of July, and while most of the country is still sweating it out in the summer doldrums, and most sportsmen are focused on finned quarry; deer season is just around the corner in California.  A zone deer hunters will start bowhunting the second week of July.  South Carolina and a couple of other states will open up in August.

So, first the news…

Lead Ban ChroncilesCA hunters are reminded that the second phase of the lead ammo ban will come into effect on July 1.

This phase adds upland birds to the list of species that must be taken with lead-free ammunition.  Also, lead free shotgun ammo is now required for taking resident small game mammals, furbearing mammals, nongame mammals, nongame birds, and any wildlife for depredation purposes.  (For some reason, if it’s any help, you are still permitted to use lead shot for Eurasian collared doves.)  Remember that the lead ammo ban has no effect on ammo used for target shooting.  It is only for hunting.  The final phase of the lead ban will kick in on July 1, 2019.  You can learn more about the lead ban on CA DFW’s website.

Feral hogsIn Missouri, the State has determined that, when it comes to feral hogs, sport hunting and eradication efforts are not compatible.  As a result, the state is shutting down sport hunting for feral hogs on any lands owned or managed by the Missouri Dept of Conservation.  This does not affect hog hunters on private land.  Since I’m not a resident of MO, nor do I hunt there, I can’t speak to the impact on the Show Me State’s hunters, but there is an unsurprising uproar from that population.  Personally (not that my opinion is crucial here), it’s probably the right call.  As I mentioned in a Facebook post earlier, feral hogs are either a destructive pest that needs to be eradicated, or they’re a game animal.  It really doesn’t work to try to have it both ways.

Rapala Drop-Point SkinnerNow, on to some gear reviews…

Fishermen have known about Rapala fishing knives for eighty years (since 1936).  I’m pretty sure my first fillet knife sported that recognizable, light, wood handle and leather sheath.  It made sense as a “first” fishing knife, since it was not only inexpensive, but it was extremely durable.  I don’t remember where or how I finally lost that thing, but it survived years of harsh use in the saltwater environment.

I’ve graduated to a “professional” knife at this point, with the white, “comfort-grip” handle and stainless blade, but it’s still a Rapala… and it’s still affordable.

I was intrigued to get an email a couple of weeks back, informing me that Rapala is now adding the Classic Birch line of hunting knives to their long list of quality products.  Even better, they offered to send me one to check out.

Rapala drop point in handThe new line includes several classic designs:

  • 3.75″ Drop point (MSRP $34.99)
  • 4.5″ Clip point (MSRP $34.99)
  • 3.75 Gut hook (MSRP $39.99)
  • 4.5″ Skinner (MSRP $34.99)
  • 3.5″ Caping knife (MSRP $34.99)
  • 3.5″ Bird knife (MSRP $29.99)

While I’d love to get my hands on all of these, I could only pick one, so I asked for the drop point.  That’s the design I personally prefer for all-around work, and the 3.75″ blade is a handy size for anything from squirrels to hogs.

I’d love to tell you I put it to work right away, but the truth is that there’s nothing around here for me to skin right now.  Still, I did play with it around the kitchen for a bit.  The edge on the sample they sent me is wicked-sharp, which is no surprise for the Rapala knives (made in the same J Marttini factory in Finland that produces their classic fishing knives).  The wooden handle is rough, and almost feels unfinished.  However, after messing with it for a few minutes, I realized it gives me a really sure grip, even under water (in the sink).  I can’t wait to get this thing bloody, but that probably won’t happen until September or so.  You can bet I’ll report back on how it performs in the field as soon as I get the chance.

Browning Blackout 6VI’ve also been holding onto a new headlamp, the Browning Blackout 6v.  This particular light is part of Browning’s Black Label Tactical line, and it’s definitely built to take a beating. Instead of the plastic body that most of the consumer headlamps offer, the Blackout comes in a waterproof (to a meter) aluminum body.

If you’ve followed the Hog Blog for very long, you know I’ve got a soft spot for quality headlamps, and I’m always looking for the best thing I can get my hands on.  I’ve tried out a bunch of lights over the years, and while most of them were pretty good, I had yet to test one that I thought was suitable for blood trailing.  That’s sort of my grail, when it comes to this sort of thing, and I’d sort of decided that my bar might be set a little high.  I have seen a couple that would probably work, but those exist on a higher plane than I do as a simple blogger, so getting a test unit has been an exercise in frustration.  Even if I could test them, I think that the $250 – $300 price tag would dampen the enthusiasm of most hunters.

The Browning, though, at an MSRP of around $99, advertises a 730 lumen output and the pure, white light definitely looks bright enough to show blood on the ground.  Again, since nothing is currently in season, I haven’t been able to really put this to the test, but walking around the yard at night, this thing cuts right through the dark to show incredible detail.  The Blackout is a spot beam, and not adjustable, but that suits me fine.  It also offers two lower settings to conserve batteries, as well as a green mode to preserve night vision… which can be really nice when going into the stand in the wee early darkness.  I also think it’s going to be great in the canoe or kayak when duck season rolls around.

Are there downsides?  Sure, a couple…

The light is a little bulkier than I’d prefer for a headlamp.  It extends about 2.5″, and weighs almost six ounces.  That’s not really a lot, until you’ve worn it for a couple of hours.  Maybe I’m sensitive, but it starts to make my head hurt.  It does fit nicely over my Stetson, though, and is a lot more comfortable worn that way.

The lithium, CR123A batteries are a little pricier than AA or AAA, but this light does need the extra power to achieve that bright beam.  According to the literature, I should see about 3 hours of use at full power, though, and that’s pretty good.  A comparably bright, high-end ($275) headlamp runs down in about half that time.  On the lowest setting, it’s supposed to give me 48 hours of continuous use.

Like many of the high-powered LED lamps, the Browning gets really hot after a short time.  I mean really hot!  I didn’t really notice the heat while I was wearing it around the house for about an hour, until I reached up to turn it off.  I learned real quick to be cautious, and make sure I avoided touching the lens or the front cap.  It will get your attention.

Overall, though, I think this light is a winner.  At $99 it’s not cheap, but compared to the cheaper headlamps I’ve tested, I think the Browning will last as long as you can keep up with it.  That’s the catch with all of these small pieces of equipment, though… they’re easy to lose.  Other than that, as far as I can tell, the only thing you can do to hurt it is to leave the batteries in too long and let them start to leak.

As always, I’ll follow up on both of these items as they get more time in the field.  I can say that I like both of these products enough to plan on using them this coming season.

Porcine Press – Hog Repellent Special Edition

January 8, 2016

It’s the best headline I could come up with on relatively short notice.

In a few states around the country, feral hogs are not only a “threat”, but a real problem for farmers.  Texas, Florida, Louisiana, California…  millions of dollars of crop and property damage are happening every year, and both government and private sector “experts” are trying to find solutions.  Shooting doesn’t help on a big scale, because it just moves the hogs away.  Trapping can be good, but it’s not widespread enough to make the sort of impact that’s required.  And research is still being done on poisons.

Sometimes, though, the solution comes from unexpected quarters.  For example… high schoolers…

We’re not the only country dealing with wild and feral hogs.  Japan is too, but there may be an innovative (and economical) solution right at our latex fingertips.  Like this…

 

Hog Problems – Think About This Before You Start Shooting

July 6, 2015

Over the years since I started paying close attention to feral hogs, I’ve seen folks refer to “hog problems” as anything from a few transient animals to sounders upon sounders that have moved in and started wholesale devastation of a piece of ground.  Likewise, I’ve seen “hog control” responses ranging from sniping individual animals with a .22 caliber rifle to aerial slaughter.

As you might expect, the success of these efforts varies as widely as the methods.  What isn’t as variable, though, is the reality that shooting at hogs is seldom the most efficient or effective method of managing a “problem”.  Consistent pressure can certainly move the animals away from an area… sometimes even permanently… but this generally means that they’ll become someone else’s problem.

If you talk to a lot of the folks who shoot hogs in a self-described effort to “control” the population, you’ll find that many of them are really just sport hunting.  They often shoot selectively, stop when they have killed a couple of animals, and even avoid killing “wet” sows (still nursing) and piglets.  There’s nothing wrong with this, of course, but if the real end game is control or eradication, sport hunting tactics and ethics aren’t going to get the job done.

What will work, particularly in cases where there is a real problem, is trapping.  I’ve written about this a time or two in the past, but I was reading an article this weekend that really brought it home again.  It’s a good piece, if you’re interested in the topic.

Here’s a snippet that sort of summarizes the piece:

For instance, Fairhead (Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Wild Hog Project Coordinator) said a property owner shouldn’t immediately rush in to shoot hogs when they’re first discovered. Instead, he said game cameras should be installed to locate the location of an entire sounder and patterns of travel routes as part of a methodical plan.

Conditioning hogs to enter a trap is recommended, he said. A trap with a remote monitored gate is critical for success and requires patience and persistence.

“Trap first, shoot second,” Fairhead said. That will also help reduce the number of trap-shy hogs on the landscape.

The idea of using a carefully planned and executed approach to pattern, condition, and then capture entire sounders is not new, of course.  However, as the article points out, the approach takes time and patience, as well as a bit of skill.  Fortunately, the skills and techniques are not difficult to learn.

The professionals over at JagerPro offer good information on their website, and they also speak at various conferences.  Led by Rod Pinkston, the organization is made up of US Army veterans, and they leverage military training, discipline, and tactics to present a methodical and effective hog control strategy.  They offer training as well, both at their site in Georgia, and at locations around the country.  For anyone who is seriously interested in learning to manage feral hogs, this is a good way to go.

I’m not suggesting that there’s no place for sport hunting, by the way.  While I don’t think sport hunters can kill enough hogs to seriously manage population densities, I do think that pressure from hunters can (sometimes) keep the populations from concentrating in a single area.  Of course, I also feel like total eradication is neither realistic nor necessary.  Overpopulation of any species, native or non-native, is a danger to the environment, but I just have a hard time believing that feral hogs represent a real environmental catastrophe (except in particularly sensitive habitats, of course).

Pumbaa In Texas. Is Timon Next?

June 25, 2015

I had to take a minute today to share this.

Everyone knows that Texas is the feral hog hotspot of the U.S.  From one end to the other, the Lone Star State is covered up in sus scrofa.  But hog hunters in some parts of Texas may be treated to another porcine invader… the wart hog.

And yes, I would have loved to stumble onto one of these big, ugly suckers!

I’m going to let you read about it here, in the Lone Star Outdoor News.

Swine Invasion- British Style

April 27, 2015

Much has been written and said about the invasion of wild hogs across the U.S.  It’s a point of contention, but also of serious concern because the animals are prolific, wide-ranging, and non-native.  Not only are they a potential threat to agriculture, they’re living (and well) in an environment that did not evolve with them.  While that may prove not to be quite the catastrophe that some would have us believe, it’s certainly something to keep an eye on.

Insulated as many of us are in America, we don’t often think much about wild boar in other places.  Sure, a handful of hunters may daydream of a driven hunt in Hungary, or a day afield with the Jaegermeister for big, German boar, but what about places like, say, England?

Wild boar were indigenous to Great Britain, and lived in the “wild” until somewhere around the 13th or 14th century, at which point they appear to have been wiped out.  Before that, however, they must have had a pretty good run.  It’s interesting (to me at least) that if you take a look at medieval  literature, heraldry, and even place names, the wild boar had a pretty prominent position throughout parts of Britain, often inspiring awe and terror.  Boar hunting was often depicted as a feat of courage, and occasionally, the root of tragedy.

Efforts to restore the wild boar were stymied over the centuries, as the people generally saw the animals as agricultural pests and quickly destroyed them.  Wealthy nobles, and even kings (James 1 and Charles 1, notably) imported boar from France to try to reestablish wild swine, but the good farmers and villagers were apparently not having it.  By the 1970s, wild boar in England were considered dangerous animals, and restricted to specially permitted zoological parks.  Certain farmers have also imported animals from Europe to raise in captivity, again, under strict regulation and controls.

Still, around 1998, at least two herds of wild boar had “mysteriously” reestablished themselves in parts of Britain, and those herds have continued to grow and prosper, despite efforts to hunt and manage them.  In the Forest of Dean, the animals have become a point of serious contention, as agricultural interests (as well as concerned citizens) call for a cull and management, while some environmentalists and animal rights factions call for them to be allowed to return to their native habitat and live their lives in “peace.”

I think it’s an interesting parallel to the situation with feral hogs in the US, and I’m betting there are lessons there for agricultural and wildlife management experts on this side of The Pond… if anyone will take the time to study them.  Of particular interest to me, a confessed layman when it comes to wildlife biology and ecology, is the arguments in Britain that suggest the wild boar should be permitted to roam free, as they provide a benefit to the ecosystem.  I certainly recognize the potential differences between a native species restored to its habitat and a non-native, but the layman in me struggles with how activities such as rooting to aerate and mix soil nutrients can be beneficial in one woodland, and detrimental in another (especially considering the broad distribution across the Old World in widely diversified habitats).

One aspect of the return of wild boar to Britain that correlates perfectly with the feral hogs in the U.S. is the terror these animals appear to invoke amongst the largely urbanized and domesticated human population.  Every week, my news feeds bring me at least one more article depicting a “horrifying” encounter between people and hogs in the English countryside.  “Attacks” are documented, almost always involving a dog, innocently strolling down the path with its people, drawing the “unwarranted” ire of a wild boar.   This is great for the sensationalist media, of course, but what sort of representation of reality is it?  I can’t help thinking of the glowing, red eyes of the “demon boar” on a Discovery Channel special… and the terrified testimony of suburbanites whose children were “threatened” by these deadly beasts.  Who will save the children?

Of course, wild boar can be dangerous, and far be it from me to unwittingly pooh-pooh the concerns of the citizens in a place I’ve never visited.  I do know that, along with my feeds about the English hogs, I receive regular reports from India, Pakistan, and Malaysia about unprovoked, wild boar attacks on villagers and farmers… some of them fatal.  Of course, as one might expect, news from rural areas in such places is sometimes questionable, both in detail and fact.  “Unprovoked” may take a different meaning in the wake of tragedy, and it is hardly unusual to demonize the attacking beasts instead of logically considering all of the circumstances and evidence.   But again, this is me, sitting in my comfortable office, with my nice computer, far from the place where these things are happening.  I could be wrong.

At any rate, all of this is by way of me finding this stuff interesting.  I’d love to be independently wealthy and able to travel the world to find these wild boar stories first hand… to maybe become another Jim Corbett, except instead of leopards and tigers, I’ll protect the villages from marauding wild boar.  You would think the days of those stories are over, but I think maybe, only the cast of characters has changed.

Sport Hunting As Wildlife Management

March 17, 2015

This is not a new discussion here, but this recent article out of South Carolina made me think it was worth trotting back out.

It appears that the hog problem in the Francis Marion National Forest has gotten bad enough that the land managers have decided to bring in some professional hunters.  And, as always seems to happen, this decision has generated some uproar from the sport hunters (or recreational hunters, or whatever you choose to call them).

To the sport hunters, it’s a question of fairness, and they argue that the SC DNR should be focused on expanding opportunities for the public, instead of paying someone to do what the hunters suggest that they would do “for free”.  But in the article, the DNR offers what I think is a pretty solid response:

“We don’t treat hogs as game animals. We want them eradicated. That’s the difference between a hog hunt and a removal,” said Sam Chappelear, a regional wildlife coordinator for the agency.

It’s an old conflict, and I’ve seen it play out all over the country.  A state has nuisance animals to remove.  Sport hunters jump and say, “let us do it!  We’ll pay for the opportunity, instead of paying professionals to do the same job!”

Sometimes, it does make sense to open hunting opportunities to non-professionals.  As many municipalities have learned, bringing in sport hunters to help manage deer populations in suburban or semi-rural areas can be an effective method to thin localized, dense herds.  There are certification programs, training, and other methods used to make sure these hunters are safe and conscientious (and accountable).  In general, this solution seems to work well for both the communities and the hunters.

But there’s a big difference between some relatively light “thinning”, and the need to eradicate or sharply reduce an entire population, especially when it comes to feral hogs.  Here are a few points that many sport hunters don’t consider… or don’t understand.

  • It’s not going to be enough to hunt a couple of hours at daybreak and sunset on your days off.  Eradication requires an all day, every day (and some nights) effort until the pigs are gone.
  • It’s not enough to find the easy trails, or sit in a blind/stand.  When the dumb pigs are gone, you have to get in there deep to get the smart ones.
  • It’s not enough to shoot a couple of good “meat pigs” or a trophy boar.  Eradication means killing everything, from the big, stinking boars to the itty-bitty, striped babies… and getting it done as quickly as possible, before the sows have a chance to drop more itty-bitty, striped babies that will grow up and make even more.
  • It’s not enough to send random hunters into the field to shoot at and scatter the sounders.  Eradication requires a coordinated effort with a plan.

I can relate to the frustration of the sport hunters.  When I was living in CA, I remember well the issues at Mt. Diablo and Mt. Hamilton with hogs tearing up sensitive habitat, and even wreaking havoc in the parks.  Like many other local hunters, I was chomping at the bit for the State to come up with a solution that would allow hunters to pursue these hogs.  And, honestly, in the case of the hogs at Mt. Hamilton, I think sport hunters could have played a positive role in pushing the pigs out of the park… or at least in keeping the pressure on them to reduce their impact.

But the State has other considerations, not the least of which is liability.  California’s reputation for litigiousness is well deserved.  The donnybrook that would likely occur if hunters were turned loose in a State Park, that close to major population centers is staggering to imagine.  Who needs that?  A few trappers, moving in quietly and setting up in the wee hours do a better job with less visibility… and less risk.

Sport hunters are a significant asset to certain wildlife population control programs.  There’s little doubt about that, and recently documented declines in whitetail overpopulation in the Southeast offer some measurable proof (although the numbers are only for a couple of years, and the trend could easily reverse) that liberal limits and lots of hunters can make a difference.  That’s great.  But when it comes to wiping out a prolific, non-native invasive species, we’re just not the right tool for the job.

 

 

 

USDA Looks At Hog Control On A National Level?

February 2, 2015

According to this (decidedly short on detail) article from High Plains Public radio, the USDA is talking about a need to manage feral hogs from a federal level, in order to mitigate the potential for large-scale impacts.

Lee (Charlie Lee, wildlife manager from Kansas State University Research and Extension) went on to say, “unless steps are taken, we could have a major train wreck because of the disease threats that feral hogs pose to our domestic swine operations, and the ecological damage will continue.”

The short piece mentioned that the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is looking into possible solutions, which include sport hunting.  I’m glad to see sport hunters included in the consideration.

Personally, I have mixed feelings about a national-level program to manage feral hogs.

On the one hand, it might alleviate some of the disparity in how different states treat the animals.  Consider, for example, that Texas basically considers them vermin and allows eradication tactics commensurate with that designation.  Dogs, knives, bows, or BB guns… just kill ’em all!  While hog hunting is a growing industry on Texas hunting ranches, residents of the Lone Star State are encouraged to treat hogs like rats, and kill or trap them at every opportunity.  In many cases, hogs are shot on sight, and left to rot in the field… which sounds like a shame, until you understand just how many hogs there are.  You can only eat so many, and unlike venison, food banks can’t accept feral swine.

Compare that to California’s approach of designating feral hogs as a “game animal,” requiring expensive tags and restricted methods of take.  Many hog hunters in CA limit themselves to one or two tags per year, and with the costs of hunting hogs on private property climbing steadily, the impact of sport hunters on the feral hog population is marginal.  And while depredation permits are fairly easy to get, many landowners recognize a cash value to keeping a population of hogs on their land, in order to attract paying hunters.

But the truth is, neither state seems to be making much headway in reducing or managing the spread of feral hogs.  According to most experts, once you have an established population of feral hogs, you need to kill about 70% of that population annually in order to just maintain stasis.  Otherwise, the best you can hope for is to move them around… temporarily drive them out of targeted areas with hunting and trapping pressure.

Maybe a consistent, nationwide approach, led by the USDA is the answer?

What could possibly go wrong?

 

 

Battle Of The Big Boars… NC vs. TX

January 27, 2015

Funny this should be going on just now, as I’m setting my sights on the move from TX back to the old stomping grounds in NC, but there you go.

First, I read about this monstrosity, taken in northern Texas.  Yeah, read the article and you’ll see that these fellas caught (not shot, but caught) a 790 pound boar hog!  That’s one, big, pig!

From the article:

“When I first saw him, Blaine’s dog looked like an earring or some kind of jewelry hanging off the hog’s head, but it really wasn’t until we got ahold of the hog that I realized how big and powerful this animal was,” Walton said. “We’ve tied hundreds of hogs and there has never been anything like this boar.”

I bet!  Anyway, that not-so-little piggy is going to market (pending veterinary exam to verify no parasites or disease).

And then there was this big sucker, from North Carolina, 707 pounds!

I don’t know what’s going on, but wild hogs in this weight class are supposed to be pretty rare.  Makes me want to load up the .325wsm and get out there!

 

Now This Is Just Funny…

January 26, 2015

Not hilarious, necessarily, but funny… and then, probably only in the context of the article and video.

The Daily Mirror shared this article and the attached video of a wild boar apparently running amuck in a South Korean restaurant.

Unfortunately, I can’t embed the video, but it’s worth watching.  You also have to read the breathlessly, hyperbolic article though.  Wild boar on the menu, indeed.

And then, please respond to the survey at the end of the article.  I’m wondering if you could guess my answer.

Sorry for the brevity of this post.  There's more substantial content coming... sometime.

Pseudorabies Transmission From Hogs To Dogs

January 16, 2015

I know I’ve called this out before, but one of the biggest threats that feral hogs present is the risk of disease that can affect livestock.  While I know they can do some environmental damage, I can’t help the feeling that it’s often overstated.  And I refuse to believe that feral hogs present any more danger to humans than most other wild animals, despite the hype heaped upon them by some media sources.

But one case of something like brucellosis, or pseudorabies, can shut down an entire farm and result in the liquidation of the entire herd.  If the outbreak spreads to multiple animals, it can shut down an entire region, resulting in significant economic disruption.  In short, it seems to me that this is the aspect of the feral hog invasion that we should all be talking about.

But with all that said, I don’t think I ever knew that pseudorabies also presents a deadly threat to dogs.  However, this article from Arkansas provides a harsh reminder that this disease is nothing to mess around with.  It’s something my friends who run hog dogs should pay close attention to, as well as a warning to those of you who have dogs in feral hog country.

While there are some vaccines available for domestic livestock (pseudorabies was declared “eradicated” on US farms in 2004),  there’s nothing out there for Fido.  According to various resources I’ve been able to look up, it’s usually fatal within two to three days, although some dogs will survive.  The best protection is to keep your dog away from feral hogs, including keeping them from eating the uncooked meat or offal.

This isn’t to say that pseudorabies is out there lurking in every hog you encounter.  In fact, it doesn’t seem to be particularly common… although reports seem to be turning up on a regular basis around the country.  In addition to the sick hogs in Arkansas, pseudorabies was recently found in hogs released in Oklahoma.  I don’t know if this represents an uptick in cases, but it should be enough to get our attention.

The disease is transmitted primarily by nose-to-nose or fecal-oral contact.  This puts hog dogs at particular risk, but any dog that spends time where hogs have roamed can be affected.  Also, as mentioned previously, the disease can also be transmitted through the raw meat and offal of infected swine.

The most common symptoms of pseudorabies infection are similar to regular rabies.  The initial symptom is uncontrollable itching, referred to as the “mad itch,”  sometimes accompanied by howling or whining.  This is followed by hyper-salivation (drooling or “foaming” at the mouth).  The next phase involves neurological impacts that can include paralysis of the jaw or neck, sometimes leading to convulsions.  Death is relatively quick, and sometimes comes before the symptoms have even manifested.

Fortunately, so far, pseudorabies is not a threat to humans.  However, feral hogs are known to carry other diseases that are dangerous to man.  I’m the last one to recommend the use of protective gear while dressing and butchering game (because I don’t use it myself), but most game departments and health experts warn hog hunters to use gloves for the messy work, and wash thoroughly when we’re done.

Anyway, I just thought this was something worth sharing on a Friday.

Now, I just wish I could get out there somewhere and hunt myself a (disease free) hog!

 

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