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Turkey Season? Already?

April 10, 2017

OK, it’s not really a surprise.  I’ve been eagerly awaiting the opener of the spring turkey season around here.  The birds had just started showing up over the past week, and I was getting a little excited for Saturday morning’s action.

Then we had a series of intense storms, and suddenly, where the birds had been, there were no birds.

I can hear them, tauntingly close, but well off across a property I can’t hunt.  That neighbor has chickens, guineas, and geese of all kinds, and I think the turkeys have taken up where there’s free food and safety.  But hope springs, as they say, eternal (or ephemeral?).  There’s still over a month of turkey season left, so we’ll see what we shall see.

Scott took his Tom with the smokepole.

In the meantime, my brother, Scott, aka the Bloodthirsty Killer, has been hard at it.  I know, because I got an email from him.

I always know what I’m in for when I get an email from him, since he hardly touches a computer most of the time.   If I see that particular address in the From: line, I pretty much know what I’m about to see.  Something has died… and that something has either big teeth, big antlers, or a long beard.

Brian has a nice Tom. Enjoy it now, mister… you’re about to be married. Muhahahaha!

But not content to show off his own prowess, Scott took it a step further this time with a photo from my soon-to-be nephew-in-law.  Yes, this young fellow is about to join this family (he ignored the warnings), so he’s proving his worth as a provider, I suppose.  Or else they’re just messing with me, knowing I’m sitting here with clean camo and unused ammo… daydreaming and drooling at the thought of some fresh turkey in the pot.

Scurvy dogs.

Guess I need to get after it, or folks are going to start thinking I’ve become an armchair hunter.

A Hog Blog Political Rant

April 1, 2017

Ya’ll know I don’t generally go in for political discussions here, particularly politics beyond those directly affecting our outdoor lives.  But I just feel like this is my damned platform, and I can use it anyway I like.  Considering that I haven’t used it at all since March 6, I ought to do something with this space.  So I’m going to rant.

Or not.

Ya’ll caught me.  It’s April 1… April Fool’s day.  As tradition requires, I’ve been beating the bushes of my brain in a battle to beget a beguiling fib.

But it dawned on me yesterday that it’s hard to find as much humor in prevarication while we’re in the midst of this whole “fake news” mania.   You might think that, with the intensified focus on false or misleading news, people would be getting better about believing some of the purely unbelievable bullshit that’s flying around out there.  If you thought that, you’d be wrong.  It’s as bad, or worse than ever.  Every time I turn around, someone shares a link from a satire site or a fake news site (they’re a real thing) and it sparks an outraged response from people who think it’s real… no matter, apparently, how unreal the story may be.  Often, the person who shared the story doesn’t realize (or care) that it’s untrue.

Then again, the whole science of meme theory and its collision with social media is a fascinating phenomenon to observe.  For example, on Facebook, yesterday, a couple of folks jumped the gun and put up some April Fool’s jokes.  In particular, Vortex Optics deserves a special mention for the video they released.  Bullet Cam is an “ad” for their new collaboration with Hornady to create a bullet-mounted, digital video camera.  Ostensibly, this will allow the shooter to get an immediate view of the results of their shot.

Now, a practical and logical mind would (or should) immediately recognize how unlikely this technology is.  Some folks in the comments on YouTube and Facebook definitely did challenge the technology, debunking the video with “carefully considered, scientific explanations” of why the video is “fake” or (and this was even more entertaining) why they wouldn’t use these bullets because they won’t perform accurately.  Others were fascinated with the idea, and did a little speculative, reverse engineering to figure out how Vortex was able to make this work.  A handful, of course, commented on the obvious… the video was posted on March 31/April 1.   Happy April Fool’s Day!

So it can be entertaining, but at times, it’s also infuriating… even frightening… to see how easily manipulated people can be.  And yeah, I have to include myself in “people”, because I’ve stepped into the trap a time or two.  It’s too easy to let a confirmation bias overwhelm our critical thinking… whether it’s an intriguing “new product” or a political smear job.

We believe because we want to believe.  I thought about that as I reviewed some of my past April 1 posts and your comments, and I realized that one of the reasons they worked so well was that some of you guys really wanted to believe I’d scored an awesome hunting spot and a new rifle.  You were excited for me that I was going to hunt an escaped buffalo.  Some of you were thrilled to read that I was moving back to Texas, after being uprooted to North Carolina.

I toyed with that emotional connection, and leveraged it to mislead you.  Today, with everything going on, I just don’t have the heart to do that to anyone.

And that’s not an April Fool’s joke.

Be well, my friends.  And remember… trust, but verify.

Lead Ban Chronicles – Updates And A Hog Apocalypse Averted

March 6, 2017

I guess it’s only right to do an update on my last lead ammo ban post, not that it’s particularly unexpected.

As an outgoing gesture, US Fish and Wildlife Service Director, Dan Ash, signed a Director’s Order which set out a plan to ban all lead ammunition and fishing tackle on any property managed by the USFWS.  This would have impacted National Wildlife Refuges, as well as some parks and “study areas”.  Even though these make up a fairly small percentage of federally managed lands in the U.S., it would have impacted many hunters and fishermen.
As I said in that previous post, I expected the Order to meet a quick, and timely end under the new administration.  As Ash had written it, there were several vulnerabilities anyway, but the new Interior Secretary, Ryan Zinke, made very short work of it in one of the first actions of his tenure.  In the Order rescinding the Order, he wrote:

“After reviewing the order and the process by which it was promulgated, I have determined that the order is not mandated by any existing statutory or regulatory requirement and was issued without significant communication, consultation or coordination with affected stakeholders…”

So that’s that… for now.  Obviously, the fight over lead ammo and fishing tackle is not going away.  There are ongoing efforts in several states to pass various restrictions on the use of lead, while the propaganda continues to flow in press releases from organizations like Center for Biological Diversity, PETA, and HSUS.

All I’ll say is to stay engaged and stay educated.  If you’re going to push back against lead ammo bans, you need to know what you’re talking about or you will undermine the entire effort.

On to other news…

There was a lot of press last month after the Texas agriculture commissioner, Sid Miller, promised to unleash a “hog apocalypse” by approving the use of a poison on the feral hog population.  The approved pesticide, Kaput, contains the anti-coagulant, Warfarin.  Warfarin has been used as an active ingredient in rat poison for many years.  It is also used in humans as a blood thinner to prevent stroke and heart attacks.  The problem is, a lethal dose for hogs would also be lethal for other critters.   In addition, very little research has been done to determine the possible effects for people who eat the meat of poisoned hogs.

According to Miller and others, the use of Kaput would have minimal negative impacts on non-target species, including humans, but offered little information as to what was considered “minimal.”  This is particularly critical because feral hogs in Texas are often trapped, shipped to containment lots, and commercially slaughtered.  Without any way to know which hogs may have eaten the poison, there would be no way to safely process and distribute the meat.

The plan also included the use of feeders that only hogs could open, although the feeders didn’t really offer any method to contain spillage and waste.  Anyone who has ever tried to keep raccoons out of a feed bin can also attest that very few solutions, short of a locked, metal lid, will keep those marauders at bay.  Black bears aren’t very numerous in Texas, although there has been some resurgence in the eastern part of the state.  They also, occasionally, cross the border out of Mexico into the western parts of the state.  Anything a hog can open, a bear can open.

The concerns with the use of the warfarin-based pesticide got even louder when sportsmen and other concerned interests got word of the plan.  Petitions went out quickly, all pushing back against the plan.  Finally, on Thursday of last week (3/3/17), District Judge Jan Soifer placed a temporary hold on the hog apocalypse plan.  This should put the brakes on this plan until, at the very least, clear research can provide the necessary information to address public concerns.  Like many sportsmen and concerned citizens, I hope that shuts this particular plan down altogether.

I haven’t heard anything lately about the studies on sodium nitrite (I’ve mentioned these in the past), but this substance was showing a lot of promise as a hog control.  Since it’s not toxic to most game species, the risks of non-target poisoning would be reduced.  And for humans… well, we already eat sodium nitrite in our bacon and several other products.  The research is still stymied by some unique issues, as well as some of the same challenges the warfarin-based poison encountered, but, from what I’ve read so far, it shows some promise.

No question feral hogs are a major problem for agricultural interests, not only in Texas, but in most of the states where they have spread.  Unfortunately, it looks like we’re still a ways away from a workable solution.  In the meantime, we can all do the farmers and the habitat a favor, and shoot some hogs!

Lead Ban Chronicles – Federal Ban On Lead Ammo?

January 23, 2017

Honestly, I wasn’t expecting to see any particularly “interesting” action in regards to lead ammo here at the changing of the guard.  I as much as said so in a recent post.  Isn’t that how it works, though?  Say it’s sunny out, and it starts to rain.

Dan Ashe, outgoing Director of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, signed a Director’s Order setting the stage for a ban on lead ammunition on all of the lands managed by that organization.  The order sets USFWS policy to: Require the use of nontoxic ammunition and fishing tackle to the fullest extent practicable for all activities on Service lands, waters, and facilities by January 2022, except as needed for law enforcement or health and safety uses, as provided for in policy.  It also calls for the USFWS to work with state fish and wildlife agencies to implement the policy.

As you might imagine, the news has made a splash, particularly in the ever-growing circle of folks who don’t read beyond the headlines (and, perhaps, by those who like to manipulate that demographic).  I’ve already seen email “alerts” from various organizations decrying, “Obama’s ban of all lead ammo on all federal lands!”

This policy change is not quite so broad, though, and it takes only a few minutes to read the actual directive.  As written, this ruling primarily affects only the National Wildlife Refuges (lands managed by the USFWS).  That will certainly impact a fair number of hunters, but we need to be clear that it does not directly apply to any lands managed by other agencies or organizations, such as the US Forest Service or the BLM.  National Forests, wilderness areas, and such are not affected.

That’s not to say that nothing here is objectionable.  The language of the directive is pretty general, particularly in laying out the justifications for the lead ban.  It states that, “Exposure to lead ammunition and fishing tackle has resulted in harmful effects to fish and wildlife species.

I have a problem with over-broad statements like this, because I believe it’s disingenuous and misleading.  It seems lazy, at best, not to be specific about what species are being impacted, and to what extent the problem exists that would justify the ban.  Truthfully, the harmful effects have only been specifically identified in some birds.  There’s simply no evidence that any mammals have shown toxic effects from scavenging lead-killed carrion.  And maybe I’m wrong (this is an aspect of the issue I haven’t researched), but I don’t know of any fish that are being poisoned by spent ammo or lost fishing sinkers.

There’s plenty of suspicion about the timing of the pronouncement as well, coming in the very last days of the Obama administration.  The suspicion is compounded by the fact that the USFWS apparently never consulted with the state agencies who manage these lands.  Really, though, this conversation has been ongoing for quite some time.  I figure that Ashe had one last chance to do this without having to deal with the guaranteed firestorm it would generate, so he made his play.  Was that a crappy move?  Sure, but unfortunately for Ashe, the pronouncement offers several openings for opponents to weaken or kill the act outright.  To begin with, the order requires collaboration with state agencies to implement restrictions.  If the state agencies are unwilling to cooperate, the Order appears to be hamstrung.  Then there’s the final section in the Order itself, which states that, if the order isn’t amended, superseded, or revoked by July 31, 2018, the provisions of the Order will terminate.  Like so many other things, good and bad in Washington, it’s possible that this order will molder on the desk and never make it into action.  Finally, of course, the incoming Director can simply revoke it right out of the box.  That all remains to be seen.  I wouldn’t place a big bet, but my sense is that this Order is going to be DOA.

So, to quickly summarize what I think are the salient points:

  • Lead is NOT banned on ALL federal lands.
  • If the Order is implemented, lead ammo and fishing tackle will be banned on National Wildlife Refuges and any other lands managed by the USFWS.
  • Don’t panic.
  • (I would add to always carry your towel, but that may be a little too esoteric.)

So, unwad your undergarments for now, but pay attention.

And here’s my once-typical disclaimer, that while I am opposed to an outright, general ban on lead ammo, I do think switching voluntarily is a good thing to do… maybe even the “right” thing to do.  It’s not an option for everybody, but it’s becoming more and more viable for more of us.

 

 

 

Safety…. I Dunno… Third?

January 9, 2017

Well, here’s something I didn’t expect to be doing right now.  I didn’t expect to be updating the blog, and I certainly didn’t expect to be writing about waterfowl hunting safety.  But here I am…

It struck me though, as I just read another piece about duck hunters dying on the water.  Three hunters and a dog drowned out on Corpus Christi Bay, during a small craft advisory.  This is one of those things that’s worth writing about.

Just a week ago, I was horrified to read about a young father and his 5 year-old son, drowning during a hunt in Texas.  It was the child’s first hunt, and any of us who are hunters can probably imagine how excited both father and son were for this occasion.  And then, for it to turn as it did… I mean, how do you even wrap your head around a tragedy like that?

There aren’t a lot of details about this, except the father and son were found in the water, near their capsized boat.  Their dog had made the shore, and apparently led the searchers back to the bodies.  Neither father nor son was wearing a life jacket when the bodies were recovered.

I have a morbid habit of trying to put myself into the minds of people in those situations, trying to imagine what they went through as it was happening.  It’s painful, especially in a situation where you know it took some time to play out.  The boat capsizes, and dumps father and son into the frigid water.  There’s the terror and shock of the actual event, of course.  For the child, there must have been a terrible wonder that, suddenly, the world is not safely in his dad’s control.  And then, for the father, the realization that he has put his child in that situation.  For all the good intentions, he knows this is his fault.  I can’t help wondering if dad had a final, remorseful realization that he did not make the youngster wear a life jacket… or that he wasn’t wearing one himself so he could save the child.

Of course, I can’t know any of this.  Maybe, mercifully, both the victims were instantly knocked unconscious and had no time for terror or self-recrimination.  I can only project from my own experience.  And I know that I almost never wear a life preserver when I’m duck hunting.  This could be me.

A life jacket, by the way, isn’t a guaranteed survival tool.  Waterfowl season takes place in the winter, when water and air temperatures are dangerously low.  Hypothermia and cold water shock are responsible for many deaths every year, even for hunters and fishermen who are wearing proper flotation gear.  In harsh conditions, the only thing a life jacket will do is make it easier for the recovery team to find your body.

But the fact is, a person weighted down with heavy clothing, ammunition, calls, and whatever else doesn’t stand much chance of surviving long enough to become hypothermic if he’s dumped in deep water.  I’ve gone overboard in hip boots and in waders, and I can speak first hand to what happens when they fill with water… and the fact that I’m still speaking at all speaks to how lucky I have been.  I can give some credit to self-rescue techniques I learned as a child (thanks, Boy Scouts of America!), but truthfully, there’s an awful lot of luck involved in my continued existence.

And still, knowing this, I almost never wear a personal flotation device… even in winter, when loaded down with gear, hunting frigid, rough water.  What the hell is wrong with me?

That’s an open question, I guess, and there are probably lots of viable answers.  But let’s not go there.

It used to be that flotation devices simply weren’t convenient to wear with hunting gear.   Life jackets and vests were bulky, immobilizing, and often, orange.  None of these things made for better duck hunting.  They were uncomfortable.  They made it hard to shoot or maneuver in the boat or blind.  And, unless they were well camouflaged, they spooked birds.  It’s no wonder that some of us who hunted “back in the day” chose to forego the insurance of a PFD.  (I do recall a coat I once owned, called the “Float Coat” or some such, made by Stearns, that had built in flotation.  It was uncomfortably bulky, but it seemed to work well, was camo, and waterproof.  I wore that thing out, and haven’t seen one like it since.)  I’ll also add that nobody made us wear them, when we were younger.  None of the adults I learned to hunt from wore them, and they never pushed me to the habit either.

These days, though, there are all sorts of options available for the safety-conscious sportsman.  Many of them are tiny and unobtrusive until you need them.  Some have quick-inflation with CO2 cartridges that can be manually, or even automatically triggered.  You can slip one on with a belt, or a low-profile harness that goes right over your heavy coat.  Of course, some of these can be pretty pricey, but considering what most of us already spend on waterfowling gear, is that really a valid deterrent?

So, here’s where this leads…

First of all (and this isn’t new for me), any time you’ve got a kid in the boat, that kid should be wearing a PFD.  This is actually law in some states, and I feel like it should be law everywhere.  Kids don’t always make the best decisions for themselves, and they’re even worse when their models (grown-ups) don’t practice what we preach.  The kid gets a life jacket or vest, or the kid stays ashore.

But what about us “models of appropriate behavior”?

I expect that this is not unique to me, but there’s probably a subconscious, stubborn, macho reason to resist wearing a PFD.  It’s past time for me to get over that.  I am not going to become a PFD evangelist or anything, but I do think wearing flotation gear on the water is something more of us should really be considering… especially when the weather and water are cold and rough.   With that in mind, while I’m not willing to make this some sort of 2017 resolution, I am going to make the extra effort to use my gear (stuff I already have, by the way) more consistently… especially when I’m out on deeper water, such as the river or waterway.  Want to join me?

 

 

A New Year’s Drabble, At The End Of A Long Season

January 3, 2017

There is something about sitting in a deer stand in the pouring rain, waiting for sunrise, secure and dry in good, waterproof gear.

The rain dampens and drowns all other sounds, dripping from the limbs overhead and plopping dully into the sodden duff.  A cardinal call peals from the brambles, and the song seems oddly piercing.  But it is just as suddenly muted, soaked up into soggy air.  Geese gabbling on the pond sound like they’re miles away, but I can see them in the dim light paddling, only yards from my perch.

Misty rain makes shadows that swim at the edges of the light.  It is the tricky time, as night and day wrestle for command.  Hyper-alert, my senses struggle to adjust.  Familiar forms are alien, morphing, shifting shades.  Is that a bush or a bobcat, branch or antler?

My rifle rests on the shooting rail.  My face is freckled with chilly sprinkles.  Perfect droplets run off my hat brim and drizzle into my lap.  I breathe breaths of clean, wet air.  Wrapped in warmth, I take it all in until I’m filled with something that I can’t define.

The wind blows and the rain comes down, and nothing moves but little birds and bushes.

Welcome, 2017.

I’m not ready for another year, but, to be honest, I wasn’t ready for the last one.

Or the one before that.

In fact, it seems to be a recurring theme as time goes by and I get older and an hour seems to get progressively shorter… dropping a few seconds at a time until weeks feel like days.  Maybe it’s true that there is such a thing as a “hill”, and once you’re over it, you begin a steady, downwind run.  Driven before the wind, it’s easy to forget how strong it’s blowing and things just go rushing by.  You can find yourself off course before you know it, with no easy way to correct.

That’s sort of how it’s felt, anyway.  I used to sort of like living at the edge of control, but I’m older now.  To keep to the nautical metaphor, I feel like I need to throw over the sea anchor or even luff the sails for a bit and let the wind out of them.  Maybe this year will be the year that I can do that.  I don’t know.

What’s it all mean for the Hog Blog?

I don’t know that either.  January usually means SHOT Show.  I’ve got my credentials for the show, but it’s very doubtful I’ll make the trip this year.  I think I mentioned the last time that I’m just not getting much out of the show any more.  Based on press releases and media invitations I’ve seen so far, the emphasis on “tactical” has doubled down this year.  I’m not sure what else they can put picatinny rails or digital camo on, but I’m just not interested in ARs, super-duper-long-range-automated-rangefinding-sniper-rifles, or other pseudo-combat gear, tailored for the civilian market.  Here’s my Man Card, if you want it.

On top of that, I’m not feeling much incentive to write frequently, which leads to reduced readership, which results in less interest from manufacturers or vendors to send me stuff to review… and if all they offer is tactical, I don’t really want to review it anyway.  It’s also true that active readership is pretty much down all across the blogosphere.  Facebook and Twitter have shortened attention spans, so if you don’t have fresh content every five or six minutes, you’re passe.  I know a few folks are still making a go of the blogs, but they are getting paid for it (or paying someone to do it for them).  I’m neither.  My biggest thrill from writing this blog was the participation of readers.  You just don’t see that any more, and I’m a little hoarse from yelling into the desert (vox clamantis, and all that).

Any of you who have been around for a while (and thanks, by the way) have probably noticed that I haven’t done much (any) hog hunting in a couple of years.  While I’m still working on that, the reality is that if I want to hunt hogs, it’s going to be a pay-to-play thing here in NC.  It’s honestly a mystery to me why hogs haven’t spread as widely here as they have in other states, but they haven’t.  I’ve heard of some good places, but it’s private land, and opportunities carry a price tag.  Public land hog hunting, as anywhere else, is either really poor or a carefully guarded secret.  So hog hunting content here will be taking a back seat to other hunting and fishing… or, to be honest, no content at all.

Sometimes, I enjoy writing for the sake of writing, so I’ll probably keep doing it from time to time.  I still follow the issues and topics that I find interesting, including lead ammunition discussions (still fairly active), and, of course, wild hogs.  I suppose I’ll share the occasional news piece, if it really strikes me as relevant or important.  I do think that, with the new administration in the White House and Congress, for better or worse, the lead ammo issue will die a quiet (if ephemeral) death… at least on the federal level.  But we’ll see.  Some states are still bouncing it around.

So, I’m not quite ready to call the Hog Blog dead, but I don’t think 2017 will signal a grand renaissance either.

Merry Christmas From Us At The Hog Blog!

December 24, 2016

Well, here we are again!  It’s Christmas Eve.

The gifts are wrapped, and under the tree.

My family’s all gathered, here in my hometown.

And I don’t have to travel all up and down.

It’s good to be home, in this place that I know.

I never thought I’d be back, but that’s how it goes.

My wish for you all, those far and those near.

Is peace, love, and family, and Christmas good cheer.

And for those in our service, so far from your home.

Know that we thank you, and you’re never alone.

Well, I hadn’t intended this doggerel rhyme.

But what the hell?  It’s Christmas time!

Happy Thanksgiving To All!

November 25, 2016

It’s “Black Friday”, depending on who you ask.  Personally, as I’m sitting here in Dallas (visiting with Kat’s family for the holiday), it looks a little grey outside, but it’s a long ways from black.  Point is, I didn’t get on here in time yesterday to pass along my Thanksgiving greetings to everyone out there, so I’m doing it now.  No reason to only give thanks on one day, but not the next.

I’ve bitched a lot over the past couple of years, but the truth is, things are pretty good altogether.  Not saying they couldn’t be better, of course. I could win the lottery.  That would be pretty great (and the celebration party would be off the hook).  But short of that…

So, I just want to offer up a sincere, “Happy Thanksgiving,” to everyone, with a reminder to focus on the positive.

And, with that, clear your schedule for the next 20 minutes or so… it’s worth it.

Duck Season… At Last!

November 13, 2016

All Geared Up Last year, duck season kind of rolled around and caught me unprepared.  I was also, to be honest, less than motivated.  We had plenty of rainy, grey days, but it was way too warm to get very excited about duck hunting.  Worse, it stayed warm all season.

On top of that, I still didn’t really know any good places to go.  It was my first season being back in NC, and over the 20 years since I moved away, development pretty much swallowed up most of my old hunting areas.  The places on the bigger water, along the Cape Fear pretty much require a motor boat, which I did not have.  The old, freighter canoe and the kayaks are OK for some things, but beating against a 5 to 7 knot current gets a little tiring.  I’m not the young man I once was, and I’m in nowhere near the physical condition I was in 20 years ago.

I’ve remedied some of that with the addition of a motor for the canoe.  This has given me mobility in a very shallow-draft boat, and I’ve been able to get out and do some exploring in the local waters, both the Neuse and the Northeast Cape Fear.  It’s also been a little chillier the past week, and despite the bright, blue skies, I was pretty fired up to get out on the opener.

It’s still early in the season, and up until this weekend, the temps have mostly stayed pretty warm.  I didn’t have really high hopes yesterday morning, but figured some of the local wood ducks would give me some action.  They did, but unfortunately, the action was to buzz by in the first shooting light, and then go on down and light around the river bend.  I never even pulled the trigger.

I have also been really looking forward to getting in a full season with my new(ish), CZ Bobwhite.  I’d been wanting a 20ga SxS for quite some time, and Kat hooked me up for my birthday last year.  I didn’t really get a lot of use out of it last season, though.  I had been a bit concerned because the gun tended to be very difficult to break open after a shot.  At first, I wrote it off to just being stiff and new, but it didn’t really feel that way.  During dove season this year, I killed a few birds, but had to pretty much break the action over my knee every time.

When I finally broke down and took a closer look, I could see a drag mark across the primer.  That’s a pretty good indication that the firing pin is either sticking, or over-protruding.  I considered trying to fix it myself, but decided against the risk of damage, and contacted CZ-USA about getting it repaired under warranty.  They told me to fill out the form (a quick process), then they sent me a repair authorization and a shipping label.  The standard turn-around time for warranty work is four to six weeks, but the rep I spoke to said it’s usually much quicker.  We’ll see.  FedEx picked it up on Friday, and I’m hoping to have it back by the time the duck season gets rolling in earnest.

R. M. Ducks?Iggy, by the way, was pretty excited about the season opener as well.  He’s not a big fan of doves, and usually spits them out when he gets close to me.  Ducks, though… well, he hasn’t had a ton of opportunity, but when he has retrieved ducks, I can see that he’s in his element.  I’m hoping the birds will come on down this season, so he’ll have plenty of chances to do his thing.

California Waterfowl Steps Up Their Advocacy Game

November 8, 2016

Let me start with this.

Many years ago, when I first got involved with Ducks Unlimited, I stayed with the organization because they were focused.  Waterfowl habitat preservation and management were the name of the game.  The organization did not veer off into the divisive politics of the 2nd Amendment, or involve itself in hunting topics that were not directly related to waterfowl or habitat.  “It’s for the birds,” was not just the axiom, but the reality.

Later, when I moved to California, I joined the California Waterfowl Association for similar reasons.  They were focused on waterfowl, specifically CA waterfowl.  It made sense to me, to belong to both DU and CWA, since California is such a huge state, with very localized issues that are critical to the Pacific flyway.  Like DU, they were seldom involved in political issues that did not relate directly to the mission.

But that may be changing…

This morning, in my email, I saw the following press release:

CWA Establishes Legislative Action Fund

The political climate in California for hunting, guns, water supply and land management issues is dire.

That’s why California Waterfowl formed the California Waterfowl Legislative Action Fund. With your help, the CWLAF will protect waterfowl interests and sportsmen from this ever-worsening erosion of our rights.

Our Goals:

  • Better educate officials, particularly state and federal legislators, about water conservation, wetlands and hunting heritage issues.
  • Improve access and influence for waterfowl interests and sportsmen at the State Capitol and Washington D.C.

California is becoming more urban, and a greater number of state and federal officeholders are elected who do not understand the important role hunters play in wildlife conservation.

Meanwhile, animal rights and anti-gun organizations are increasing their influence at the state and federal levels.

On top of all that, competing demands for water continue to increase, while waterfowl habitat is threatened by urban growth.

The California Waterfowl Legislative Action Fund was formed to fight these trends through political advocacy, education and public outreach efforts.

It is critical that we be as effective as possible in informing legislators and the general public about sportsmen’s important contributions to society.

By supporting us, you will make those necessary education and outreach efforts to decision-makers more successful.

You will also help us fight back against anti-hunting and anti-gun extremists threatening to take our outdoor heritage and rights away.

So donate today! Visit www.calwaterfowlactionfund.org.

At first glance, I was a little bit disappointed to see this.  While the goals stated above appear to maintain the focus on waterfowl and habitat, I saw it veering into the murky realm of defending “gun rights”, and possible entanglement in the sucking morass that is the battle against anti-hunters in Sacramento.  While I’m not a member now (I don’t live in CA anymore), I don’t think I would have been happy to see my membership fees diverted from habitat protection, acquisition, and management.

In comparison, this is generally ground that Ducks Unlimited does not tread, and I think they have benefited from keeping clear.  DU funds go to the specific mission, and nothing else.  Bypassing the divisive political issues, like 2nd Amendment or broad ethical fights that have nothing to do with waterfowl or habitat, has allowed the organization to keep a fairly diverse membership across the country.  Of course, their position has not come without criticism, but the results have been largely positive.

Still, Cal Waterfowl is not DU, and California is not the whole country (plus Canada and Mexico, where DU is also engaged).  There are very real and specific, localized threats to all hunting in the state, including waterfowl hunting.  The more I thought about it, the more I recognized that this change is probably necessary.

Most of the organizations in California that profess to hunter advocacy have morphed, in one way or another, into gun rights organizations.  The focus has shifted to fighting gun policies, which is mostly justifiable, but the platforms are verging on NRA-level extremism.  The fact is that many hunters do not agree with these extremist positions, and as a result, they withdraw both their support and their engagement… and with them goes a critical degree of political strength.    In California, of all places, hunters need all the political clout they can get.

With the exception of the Sportsmen’s Alliance, Golden State hunters really have no organization committed to fighting the myriad threats to hunting, whether it’s misguided legislation or threats to hunting access on State and Federal lands.  And no other sportsmen’s organization is taking on the water issues that are wracking the state right now.  CWA is generally respected and well-positioned to take up that banner.

Like I said, I’m not in CA any more, and if I’m completely honest, I’ve sort of surrendered much hope in changing the political direction of gun and hunting policies in that state.  It’s one of the reasons I chose to move away.  But for those who are still living there, by choice or by necessity, I think it’s worth giving the Cal Waterfowl Legislative Action Fund a close look… and maybe giving them a few of your hard-earned dollars as well.

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